The donkey's cap, or how does learned helplessness work

The donkey's cap, or how does learned helplessness work

Albert Einstein made it clear: "Everyone is a genius, but if you judge a fish on his ability to climb a tree, he will spend his life believing he is stupid."
This brilliant mathematician has defined, in a few words, the silent monster that teaches many children that they are incapable.
Many people whose abilities are never exploited, because the academic environment is structured only to value certain skills, and despise others. A true genius in literature can spend all his life without revealing himself if his environment only glorifies sports skills.
This is how impotence learned, or acquired, works.

Useless genius, or learned helplessness

During his high school years, Albert Einstein was not particularly noticeable for his grades, having bad results in letters as in science.
His later success was further evidence of the ineptitude of standard academic teaching, which requires each student to learn given information, without taking into account the abilities of each individual.
Learned helplessness is born in the students' brains, and plays a preponderant role in their future.
The learned helplessness, a theory first articulated by the psychologist Martin Seligman, is quite simple to understand. A person will retain the stigma of his incompetence all his life, continuous failures that will have known in a discipline. So she will keep an artificial negative view of herself in relation to this discipline, even if she would have the means to solve a given situation.
It is normal to say of a child that he is "null in math" or "that he is not made for languages". However, this is not the truth. By creating this first stage of acquired helplessness, this thought is born in the mind of the student: "Why am I going to try to learn a subject in which I am bad?"
This preconceived idea which is formed in the mind of a young individual causes it to fail inexorably in the discipline in which it is supposedly inferior, which accomplishes de facto the prophecy of his teachers and adults of his environment.
The conclusion we can reach, without risk of deception, is to say that no one can define someone's abilities on the basis of a series of failureswhich are fundamental to learning and understanding a given discipline.
The human being learns from his mistakes, and the acquired helplessness opposes this natural tendency of teaching by failure.
This can be summarized as follows: when you know how to write, no one will ask you if you managed to do it five weeks later or earlier than the rest of your classmates.
The fact that you are able to do it is the only thing that matters. And if you continue to practice, you will become proud of your failures and all the way you have come to learn, and perfect that ability.
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